PIC

Driving static LCD displays

Most projects need to output information to people. Many projects use text LCD displays, which are very flexible and can provide a lot of readable information.

But many projects need to display only a little information. Maybe they need to be even cheaper. Perhaps there's only a small battery available and it needs to run for a long time. In these cases a statically driven LCD display or panel may be all that's needed.

IMAGE_00064.jpg

Light Dimming

This information can be dangerous and lethal if not used properly. It is assumed that the reader is competant with high voltages, and has the knowledge necessary to implement a safe working and use environment when dealing with electricity, and its associated hazards. YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY. This is provided for informational purposes and does not imply any warranty or responsibility on the author's part.

Please support this site: If you find this information useful, interesting, or entertaining, please help me by voting for my entry on the MyPIC32 contest, and learn more about Microchip's new line of 32 bit microcontrollers. By viewing a few of the contest entries each week you will be eligible for community prizes, such as an iPod Touch. Thanks!

Programming the PIC16F84 Microcontroller

[Also available in an offline version including supporting files]

PIC MICROCONTROLLERS:

When studying the PIC series of microcontrollers, the first thing to realize is that the architecture is completely different from anything you are probably used to. This makes understanding the PIC quite confusing at first. You are probably familiar with the spinal cord type of computer with memory, cpu and perpherial chips hooked in parallel to the same data and address bus. The PIC chips have two separate 'data' busses, one for instructions and one for everything else. Instructions are essentially in ROM and dedicate the microcontroller to doing one task. There is very little RAM, a few dozen bytes, and this is reserved for variables operated on by the program. There is also very little 'data' storage, again a few dozen bytes, and this is in EEPROM which is slow and clumsy to change.

PIC Links

Please support this site: If you find this information useful, interesting, or entertaining, please help me by voting for my entry on the MyPIC32 contest, and learn more about Microchip's new line of 32 bit microcontrollers. By viewing a few of the contest entries each week you will be eligible for community prizes, such as an iPod Touch. Thanks!

Links on this page were last checked (by hand) in 2000.

Please Notify me of any problems, or if you have something to be included.

XML feed